More than 150 items belonging to Ruth Bader Ginsburg to be sold at auction

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More than 150 items belonging to Ruth Bader Ginsburg to be sold at auction

More than 150 items belonging to the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be auctioned off by Virginia-based auction house the Potomack Company. File Photo by Kevin Dietsch/UPI | License Photo

More than 150 personal items belonging to the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be placed up for auction through the end of this month.

An auction featuring Ginsburg’s art collection is open until April 27 and a second auction including items from her home and office will remain open until April 28 through Virginia-based auction house the Potomack Company.

“She had pieces that are appealing to a very diverse community and [the auction] is accessible to everyone,” Potomack Company owner Elizabeth Wainstein told Axios. “So, that’s been the message that she sent in her legal career, that everyone has a place at the table.”

The items are on public display at Potomack’s Old Town gallery in Alexandria, Va., and a majority of the proceeds from the auction will be donated to the Washington National Opera, which Ginsburg frequented, and another 10% of the seller’s commission will be donated to Women of Berkeley Law fellowships.

The lot features works by Pablo Picasso including an etched ceramic plate that has received a bid as high as $15,000 and a Picasso engraving sheet that was in Ginsburg’s bedroom with a bid of $5,000.

Several pieces of art depicting Ginsburg are also up for auction including a caricature of the judge commissioned by The New York Times that has garnered a bid of $7,500 and a laminated drawing of Ginsburg by her grandson, which has a current bid of $7,000.

Other notable items include a glass vase given to those who attended President Barack Obama’s inauguration, which currently has a high bid of $750 and a monogrammed black fur coat with a bid of $4,250.

Ginsburg died on Sept. 18, 2020, of complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer after serving 27 years on the Supreme Court that saw her consistently break through glass ceilings, challenging social norms and using her intellect to win consensus among her peers

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